10 Spooky Board Games That'll Haunt Your Halloween

Do you know what really scares the #@$% out of us? Missing out on the perfect excuse to play some creepy (but fun!) board games on Halloween. From mummies and vampires to werewolves and gargoyles, we present our list of “spooky” board games that are perfect to play this Halloween.


Photo Credit: Board Game Geek

1) Dead of Winter: A Crossroads Game

The first game in this series, DoW puts 2-5 players in a small, weakened colony of survivors in a world where most of humanity is either dead or diseased, flesh-craving monsters. Each player leads a faction of survivors with dozens of different characters in the game.

Dead of Winter is a meta-cooperative psychological survival game. This means players are working together toward one common victory condition — but for each individual player to achieve victory, he must also complete his personal secret objective. This secret objective could relate to a psychological tick that’s fairly harmless to most others in the colony, a dangerous obsession that could put the main objective at risk, a desire for sabotage of the main mission, or (worst of all) vengeance against the colony! Certain games could end with all players winning, some winning and some losing, or all players losing. Work toward the group’s goal, but don’t get walked all over by a loudmouth who’s looking out only for his own interests!

– Plaid Hat Games

Photo Credit: Board Game Geek

2) Lucidity: Six-Sided Nightmares

You have the ability to enter the dream world: a world of vivid hallucinations and horrific monsters. Draw power from the Nightmares that live there, but do not let them corrupt you. For there are other Dreamers seeking power this night, and there is only room for one to escape from the realm of Nightmares.

Should you become corrupted and turn into a Nightmare yourself, you must hunt down the other Dreamers and consume their power. When the night is over, only one Dreamer or Nightmare will be left standing.

Renegade Game Studios

Photo Credit: Fantasy Flight Games

3) Arkham Horror

The year is 1926, and it is the height of the Roaring Twenties. Flappers dance till dawn in smoke-filled speakeasies drinking alcohol supplied by rum runners and the mob. It’s a celebration to end all celebrations in the aftermath of the war to end all wars.

Yet a dark shadow grows in the city of Arkham. Alien entities known as Ancient Ones lurk in the emptiness beyond space and time, writhing at the gates between worlds. These gates have begun to open and must be closed before the Ancient Ones make our world their ruined domination.

Only a handful of investigators stand against the Arkham HorrorWill they Prevail?

Fantasy Flight Games

Note: If you choose this for your game night, you might not want to plan on anything else — it’s an epic game that generally lasts a couple of hours … if the “Ancient Ones” don’t get you first.


Photo Credit: Bezier Games

4) Werewords

In Werewords, players guess a secret word by asking “yes” or “no” questions. Figure out the magic word before time is up, and you win! However, one of the players is secretly a werewolf who is not only working against you, but also knows the word. If you don’t guess the word in time, you can still win by identifying the werewolf!

To help you out, one player is the Seer, who knows the word but must not to be too obvious when helping you figure it out; if the word is guessed, the werewolf can pull out a win by identifying the Seer!

Bezier Games

Photo Credit: Board Game Geek

5) Gloom

The world of Gloom is a sad and benighted place. The sky is gray, the tea is cold, and a new tragedy lies around every corner. Debt, disease, heartache, and packs of rabid flesh-eating mice—just when it seems like things can’t get any worse, they do. But some say that one’s reward in the afterlife is based on the misery endured in life. If so, there may yet be hope—if not in this world, then in the peace that lies beyond.

In the Gloom card game, you assume control of the fate of an eccentric family of misfits and misanthropes. The goal of the game is sad, but simple: you want your characters to suffer the greatest tragedies possible before passing on to the well-deserved respite of death. You’ll play horrible mishaps like Pursued by Poodles or Mocked by Midgets on your own characters to lower their Self-Worth scores, while trying to cheer your opponents’ characters with marriages and other happy occasions that pile on positive points. The player with the lowest total Family Value wins.

Atlas Games

Photo Credit: Board Game Geek

6) King Of Tokyo: Halloween

King of Tokyo: Halloween includes two new monsters for use with the King of Tokyo base game: Pumpkin Jack and Boogie Woogie.  The expansion also includes six orange-and-black engraved dice (to fit the Halloween theme, of course) and twelve new Power cards to be shuffled into the deck.

IELLO

Note: This game is meant to be played with the base version of King of Tokyo. In King of Tokyo, players take on the roles of mutant monsters, gigantic robots, and strange aliens—all of whom are destroying Tokyo city (and each other) to become the one and only “King of Tokyo”. This is one of our Gamemasters’ favorite recommendations, especially when it comes to board games for kids.


Photo Credit: Steam

7) Onirim

You are a Dreamwalker, lost in a mysterious labyrinth, and you must discover the oneiric doors before your dreamtime runs out – or you will remain trapped forever!

You may wander through the chambers of dreams, hoping that chance will reveal the doors, or you can linger in each type of room. In both cases, you will have to deal with the slithering Nightmares, which haunt the hallways of the labyrinth.

Onirim is a solo/cooperative card game. You (and a partner, if you wish) must work (together) against the game to gather the eight Door cards before the deck runs out; you can obtain those Door cards either by playing cards of the same color three turns in a row, or by discarding (under specific circumstances) one of your powerful Key cards. In both cases you will have to decide the best use of each card in your hand and carefully play around the Nightmares. Those cards are hidden in the deck and will trigger painful dilemmas when drawn…

Z-Man Games, Inc

Photo Credit: mob.org

8) Mysterium

In Mysterium, one player takes the role of ghost while everyone else represents a medium. To solve the crime, the ghost must first recall (with the aid of the mediums) all of the suspects present on the night of the murder. A number of suspect, location and murder weapon cards are placed on the table, and the ghost randomly assigns one of each of these in secret to a medium.

Each hour (i.e., game turn), the ghost hands one or more vision cards face up to each medium, refilling their hand to seven each time they share vision cards. These vision cards present dreamlike images to the mediums, with each medium first needing to deduce which suspect corresponds to the vision cards received. Once the ghost has handed cards to the final medium, they start a two-minute sandtimer.

After time runs out, the ghost reveals to each medium whether the guesses were correct or not. Mediums who guessed correctly move on to guess the location of the crime (and then the murder weapon), while those who didn’t keep their vision cards and receive new ones next hour corresponding to the same suspect. Once a medium has correctly guessed the suspect, location and weapon, they move their token to the epilogue board and receive one clairvoyancy point for each hour remaining on the clock.

If one or more mediums fail to identify their proper suspect, location and weapon before the end of the seventh hour, then the ghost has failed and dissipates, leaving the mystery unsolved. If, however, they have all succeeded, then the ghost has recovered enough of its memory to identify the culprit.

Libellud

Photo Credit: substreammagazine.com

9) Betrayal At House On The Hill

Betrayal at House on the Hill quickly builds suspense and excitement as players explore a haunted mansion of their own design, encountering spirits and frightening omens that foretell their fate. With an estimated one hour playing time, Betrayal at House on the Hill is ideal for parties, family gatherings or casual fun with friends.

Betrayal at House on the Hill is a tile game that allows players to build their own haunted house room by room, tile by tile, creating a new thrilling game board every time. The game is designed for three to six people, each of whom plays one of six possible characters.

Secretly, one of the characters betrays the rest of the party, and the innocent members of the party must defeat the traitor in their midst before it’s too late! Betrayal at House on the Hill will appeal to any game player who enjoys a fun, suspenseful, and strategic game.

Avalon Hill Games, Inc.

Photo Credit: Bezier Games

10) One Night Ultimate Werewolf

One Night Ultimate Werewolf is a fast game for 3-10 players in which everyone gets a role: One of the dastardly Werewolves, the tricky Troublemaker, the helpful Seer, or one of a dozen different characters, each with a special ability. In the course of a single morning, your village will decide who is a werewolf…because all it takes is lynching one werewolf to win!

Because One Night Ultimate Werewolf is so fast, fun, and engaging, you’ll want to play it again and again, and no two games are ever the same.

Bezier Games

All of these spooky games and more can be found in our game library. Simply ask one of our Gamemasters to play and let the haunting…er, fun…begin!